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#74563 by danlisman
Sun Feb 06, 2011 3:13 pm
Hi,
I am set up with Modem -> Ooma -> Router(LAN).
Therefore, Ooma QoS controls priority of household internet surfing.
My attitude is: If the Ooma phone is in use, all household internet use can sit on its hands, pause, or slow to a crawl.
I think setting QoS both upstream and downstream internet speed to 2000 kbps over max would accomplish this.
What does setting QoS up and down speed to zero do??
Yes, I see that 0 will disable, but what does that mean??
Wouldn't that mean "all household internet use can sit on its hands, pause, or slow to a crawl" ??
Question: Is disabling QoS exactly the same as setting QoS to something over max available?? How are they different??
Thanks
Dan
#74566 by highq
Sun Feb 06, 2011 3:32 pm
Disabling QoS means telling the hardware to make no attempt to favor one type of network traffic over any other.
#74567 by thunderbird
Sun Feb 06, 2011 3:34 pm
danlisman wrote:Hi,
I am set up with Modem -> Ooma -> Router(LAN).
Therefore, Ooma QoS controls priority of household internet surfing.
My attitude is: If the Ooma phone is in use, all household internet use can sit on its hands, pause, or slow to a crawl.
I think setting QoS both upstream and downstream internet speed to 2000 kbps over max would accomplish this.
What does setting QoS up and down speed to zero do??
Yes, I see that 0 will disable, but what does that mean??
Wouldn't that mean "all internet use can sit on its hands, pause, or slow to a crawl" ??
Question: Is disabling QoS exactly the same as setting QoS to something over max available?? How are they different??
Thanks
Dan

Setting Ooma QoS settings to zero:
While you are using your Ooma phone, and someone else uses computer(s) on your LAN for large bandwidth activities; could cut the Ooma reserved bandwidth available for the Ooma device so much, that you may have difficulties using the Ooma device. You would have poor Quality of Service phone conversations, etc.
#74570 by danlisman
Sun Feb 06, 2011 4:36 pm
thunderbird wrote:Setting Ooma QoS settings to zero:
While you are using your Ooma phone, and someone else uses computer(s) on your LAN for large bandwidth activities; could cut the Ooma reserved bandwidth available for the Ooma device so much, that you may have difficulties using the Ooma device. You would have poor Quality of Service phone conversations, etc.


Okay, so if I set Ooma QoS up and down to "way over" (like 2000 kbps over) max available, Ooma call would never get interference from other household internet activity? Right? That is what I want.
#74572 by danlisman
Sun Feb 06, 2011 5:01 pm
thunderbird wrote:Theoretically you statement is true as long as your Ooma device is placed behind your modem.


I am set up with DSL Modem -> Ooma -> Router(LAN) computer.
So I think we are saying the same thing.
Thanks
Dan
#74574 by danlisman
Sun Feb 06, 2011 7:11 pm
http://ooma.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/112
Well I thought I understood until I re-read Ooma help link. Their scenario 3 is what I am proposing, and their picture shows packet loss from Ooma phone. I am not convinced that their explanation is accurate.
Their total omission of download considerations is also upsetting.
My trial-and-error testing have shown no noticeable distinctions in any of these scenarios. Actually, I wonder if this is just a dummy screen with all overrides forced by Ooma switch.
:? Anybody else??
#74575 by thunderbird
Mon Feb 07, 2011 2:00 am
danlisman:
When I did early on testing I came up with results like yours. I could never find that QoS "sweet spot". Since I had a good router that handled QoS, I ended up placing my Ooma Telo behind my router. I let my router handle QoS, and set my Ooma Telo QoS settings, instead of to zero, to much higher numbers than the download, upload bandwidth of my Internet provider. That finally worked for me. Later after an Ooma firmware update, I tested again and it seemed to make no difference how I set QoS settings in the Ooma Telo.

Probably Internet provider upload/download speeds/bandwidth has more to do with how effective Ooma QoS settings are, and how they take effect, than anything else.
#74578 by EA PA
Mon Feb 07, 2011 7:32 am
danlisman

I agree - very confusing document - this is what I read originally that prompted my QoS question - I like Thunderbirds explanation better - and your solution as well - but I am not sure that this is the issue that I am seeing - my problem with 10% of my calls are too widely reported - In fact I think I am better off than many at this point based upon what I am reading. I am just moving from setting to setting to try everything I can adjust to find the sweetspot - otherwise my wife will seek to retain my copper link :( . I have run every diagnostic in the planet and have found nothing. Personally I could live with 90% but....

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