Need extra help installing your Ooma Hub or Telo system? Let us know.
#73465 by Ganne
Sat Jan 22, 2011 3:16 pm
My computer is in an upstairs bedroom. I am used to seeing our phone answering machine downstairs by the front door when we walk in the house. Is there a way to connect my Telo (or my phone answering machine base) downstairs ---- away from the computer? Some wireless adapter or something?
#73467 by thunderbird
Sat Jan 22, 2011 3:38 pm
Where is your modem located?

Do you have a router and where is it located?

You must have a phone outlet near your front door, Which is good.

Are you using your Ooma device for your answering machine, or are you using your old answering machine?

Is there a home LAN network cable located near your front door, where your answering machine was located?
#73905 by Ganne
Fri Jan 28, 2011 6:53 pm
Modem/router is upstairs by computer. We could use either the Telo or our old answering machine (doesn't matter). There is not a home network LAN cable by the front door.
#73925 by thunderbird
Sat Jan 29, 2011 4:16 am
If you aren’t using your house telephone wiring, you can feed your Ooma device phone output into your home’s phone wiring, by routing a phone cord from your Ooma device phone port, to a nearby house phone outlet. This will feed the Ooma dial tone through out your home.

But first you must physically disconnect your old phone provider’s connection from the street coming into the house.
If you are using DSL for other things, than it get a little more complicated.

If you use DSL for other things, stop and post that condition and someone will help with the DSL setup, house wiring setup.

Than go into your “My Ooma” Internet page, to “Preferences” – “ Voicemail”- “Broadband Answering Machine” – “ Voicemail pick-up time”. Set the “Voicemail pick-up time” to more rings than you Old Answering Machine is set too.

If you disconnected your Old Answering Machine is from the phone outlet by the front door, reconnect/reinstall the Old Answering Machine.

Last do a test with your cell phone to make sure everything is working properly.
#73948 by Davesworld
Sat Jan 29, 2011 2:05 pm
You can have the Telo as far away from your modem as you need it to be. Ethernet over cat 5 does not degrade until around 100 meters (328 feet) on a single cable run, it can be much longer if it either goes through a switch at the end of the 100 meters or a repeater.

I would avoid using VOIP over wifi unless it's a sip client in your cellphone where there is no other choice.
#73957 by nn5i
Sat Jan 29, 2011 4:28 pm
Davesworld wrote:You can have the Telo as far away from your modem as you need it to be. Ethernet over cat 5 does not degrade until around 100 meters (328 feet) on a single cable run, it can be much longer if it either goes through a switch at the end of the 100 meters or a repeater.

I would avoid using VOIP over wifi unless it's a sip client in your cellphone where there is no other choice.


I use the Telo separated from the router by an 802.11g wifi link (AP at the router end, Client Bridge at the Telo end), and it works perfectly well. They're at opposite ends of the house. Of course, it also works perfectly well using a CAT5 cable from the router to the Telo. Comparing these two configurations, there's no identifiable difference in how well it works.

Specifically, the router is a Netgear WNR834b running DD-WRT build 14311, and the Client Bridge is a Linksys WTR54GS running DD-WRT build 14896. But any AP (or wireless-g router) and any Client Bridge would work as well, I think.

So tell us, why would you avoid using wifi?
#73959 by murphy
Sat Jan 29, 2011 4:55 pm
WiFi is half-duplex.
Wired is full-duplex.
I'll take wired over wireless any day.
#74017 by nn5i
Sun Jan 30, 2011 4:55 pm
murphy wrote:WiFi is half-duplex.
Wired is full-duplex.
I'll take wired over wireless any day.


So will I, when possible; and while WiFi is almost always HDX today, some of today's 802.11n routers have multiple receivers and multiple transmitters and can transmit on 2.4 GHz while receiving on 5 GHz (or vice versa) simultaneously; so it is mostly a matter of firmware development that prevents FDX on WiFi today. I think it likely that we will see FDX WiFi on SOHO routers before very long. But the OP doesn't need that.
FDX will be useful for some things, but is wholly unnecessary for good VoIP performance. HDX is plenty fast enough, even in 802.11g, and way faster than necessary in 802.11n. Two cheap 802.11g routers, talking HDX on 2.4 GHz, are fast enough not to degrade the performance of a Telo. At all. So the OP could certainly do what I do -- run Telo through WiFi. After all, the inquiry wasn't about the fastest way to transfer big files over a network; it was about running a Telo. Telo doesn't require high speeds.

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