Need extra help installing your Ooma Hub or Telo system? Let us know.
#72969 by sharing411
Fri Jan 14, 2011 6:52 pm
My Ooma is now stand-alone. I can hear a dial tone when I tested the fax line that is hooked up to Ooma Telo via splitter. Haven't tried to actually send a fax. Someone tried to fax me a document today. The voicemail picked up but the fax machine did not receive and print the fax. What went wrong? The fax machine is set to pick up at minimal rings and the voice mail is set to pick up at 4 rings but the fax has always received a fax transmission as soon as it hears the fax tones coming in from the sender. Is Ooma not good for faxing - sending and receiving? Is there something I need to know about set up?
#72973 by thunderbird
Fri Jan 14, 2011 9:07 pm
Did you see the post that is directly below yours?

"Problem of receiving fax with Hub"

Both situtations are probably a closed port in the router.

In that case the Ooma device was moved before the router, than the fax worked.

But if you don't want to do that you could put your Ooma device in your router's DMZ or create rules opening the ports that Ooma uses in your router.

Do whatever works best for you.

If you have your Ooma device behind (on the LAN side of) your router you might try the following:

To do either of the following you have to establish a static IP address, obtained from your router, for your Ooma device. In most routers you can assign a static IP address for a device. Or in Ooma Setup you can assign a static IP address obtained from your router. If you need more detailed instructions I can post or you can seach this forum to locate them. Also go into Ooma setup, under "Network" than "MODEM Port MAC Address" select "Use built in", than select "Update".

First: With your Ooma device Placed placed behind (LAN side of) your router, place your Ooma device in the router's DMZ.

----OR----

Second: With your Ooma device placed behind (LAN side of) your router, create a rule(s) to open the following ports in your router.
Service Ports:
Ooma uses the following application ports for data and voice traffic:
UDP 53, UDP 123, UDP 514, UDP 1194,UDP 3386, UDP 3480, UDP 10000-20000, TCP 53 and TCP 443.

Good Luck
#72996 by highq
Sat Jan 15, 2011 12:56 pm
thunderbird wrote: ... ...
With your Ooma device placed behind (LAN side of) your router, create a rule(s) to open the following ports in your router
Service Ports:
Ooma uses the following application ports for data and voice traffic:
UDP 53, UDP 123, UDP 514, UDP 1194,UDP 3386, UDP 3480, UDP 10000-20000, TCP 53 and TCP 443.


Thunderbird, you keep talking about "opening ports in the router".

Take port 53. The odds that ANY site with an ooma device is providing DNS services are rather miniscule, so that incoming requests on port 53 aren't likely to show up at all. OTOH, no computing device can do much without being able to contact a DNS server, so when and why would it ever occur that outgoing port 53 needed unblocking?

Similarly with regard to ports 123 and 443. Home computers hardly ever answer NTP or HTTPS inquiries, so incoming requests on those ports aren't likely, while unblocking them as outbound ports shouldn't be required: why would they have been disallowed in the first place?

IOW, how often is the average Ooma user going to find ANY outgoing ports blocked at all, so that he/she has to unblock a single one? And why open incoming ports at all if they remain unforwarded from the WAN to the LAN?
#73019 by thunderbird
Sun Jan 16, 2011 12:10 am
highq:

1. The ports to be opened list come from Ooma Support at http://ooma.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/104. Not knowing how Ooma does business, to be safe, I always list the Ooma list.
2. The ports opened allow access for one IP address only, the Ooma device’s static IP address. That’s why a static IP address must be assigned to the Ooma device, before opening (port forwarding) Ooma device required ports, or placing the Ooma device in the DMZ. If the router is configured properly, the opened Ooma IP address ports will not give WAN access to any other computer or device on the router’s LAN, only to the Ooma device.
3. It is correct that most home routers only block inbound traffic. But in most cases because a transaction on the Internet requires validation, two-way traffic is required to complete the Internet transaction, even though the bulk of the information transferred is in the outbound direction.
4. Router configurations and router security, from the different router manufactures, very greatly. That’s why most people never have to change anything, but a few have all sorts of problems, and have to make router firewall changes.
#73040 by highq
Sun Jan 16, 2011 11:11 am
thunderbird wrote:highq:

1. The ports to be opened list come from Ooma Support at http://ooma.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/104. Not knowing how Ooma does business, to be safe, I always list the Ooma list.
2. The ports opened allow access for one IP address only, the Ooma device’s static IP address. That’s why a static IP address must be assigned to the Ooma device, before
opening (port forwarding) Ooma device required ports, or placing the Ooma device in the DMZ. If the router is configured properly, the opened Ooma IP address ports will not give WAN access to any other computer or device on the router’s LAN, only to the Ooma device.
3. It is correct that most home routers only block inbound traffic. But in most cases because a transaction on the Internet requires validation, two-way traffic is required to complete the Internet transaction, even though the bulk of the information transferred is in the outbound direction.
4. Router configurations and router security, from the different router manufactures, very greatly. That’s why most people never have to change anything, but a few have all sorts of problems, and have to make router firewall changes.

The reference you cite says rather clearly: "Ooma uses the following application ports for outbound data and voice traffic: ..."

So if you're going to tell people to open ports, mention that you mean OUTBOUND ports -- but the odds that a TCP/IP-naive poster to this forum has got blocked outbound ports are asymptotically close to zero. Most any router lets one block all inbound ports and then open up exceptions -- but name a router found in residential settings that has similar outbound controls. If it does have such control, perhaps it can be for specified IP addresses, but unless you know of actual models with this capability, why in the world tell folks that a static IP is necessary?

As to two-way communications, the TCP stack maintains state. An incoming packet that is sent to a blocked port WILL BE ADMITTED if it the state table shows that it is an ANSWER to something outgoing a few moments before. IOW, what a firewall generally claims is "don't talk to us unless we first to talk to you -- we'll shut out anything you try to say to us except in explicit reaction to something we've said, and be assured that your answer will propagate only to the one who requested it, not to the others on our network."

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