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#69491 by davevt98
Sun Nov 21, 2010 9:08 am
I have a fairly complex system and I am trying to get OOMA distributed to all outlets.

Here is the system:

(All wires are cat 6)

Cable Modem --> Apple Airport Express Router --> Dell 24 Port Gigabit Switch

The switch feeds internet to all outlets and internet connected devices. Can someone please explain where to hook in Ooma to distribute Ooma to all jacks?

I have the Ooma connected to the router for the "internet" and the "home network" connected to the switch. I have a rj11 telephone cable connected from Ooma to the switch. This setup is not working as is.

I also have some type of cat5 telephone distributor in the av closet. It is not being used at the moment and don't think it does need to be used. All ports are still cat5.

Any help would be greatly appreciated. I am sure I am doing something wrong. Hopefully it is something simple.
#69493 by murphy
Sun Nov 21, 2010 9:34 am
Telephone wiring and internet wiring are apples and oranges. You need two independent set of wires in your house. One set for internet connections and a second set for telephone connections.
#69496 by lbmofo
Sun Nov 21, 2010 11:41 am
Ooma's home port is used to connect other devices to the internet so you'd need an ethernet cable to connect to the home port.

The phone port is where the dialtone is coming out of so to distribute dialtone to the rest of the house, you'd need to find a voice jack in your house and just feed the dialtone into it so the rest of the voice jacks in the house would also get the dialtone. Make sure your voice house wiring is disconnected from the telephone company.
#69500 by davevt98
Sun Nov 21, 2010 2:41 pm
The house is new construction. It is only 6 months old. There is no specific telephone cable - it is only cat 5 cable. We were told that this is the way all new telephone systems are configured since copper landlines are dead.

I read that the rj11 cord could distribute the telephone signal throughout the house and they fit into the rj45 fine. My question is how to distribute it?
#69502 by highq
Sun Nov 21, 2010 3:42 pm
OK, it's no big deal to use Cat 5 or Cat 6 cable to distribute telephone signals. Since they have eight wires (or maybe even ten) instead of the usual four in "classic" telephone wiring,
it means that each jack can present you with (or five) telephony lines instead of two.
The same kind of cable can carry either type of traffic, but the wall jacks in your abode have somehow to be labeled as to which type of traffic they are offering.
#69504 by Jerry_NA
Sun Nov 21, 2010 4:57 pm
"I have the Ooma connected to the router for the "internet" and the "home network" connected to the switch. I have a rj11 telephone cable connected from Ooma to the switch. This setup is not working as is. ... I also have some type of cat5 telephone distributor in the av closet. It is not being used at the moment and don't think it does need to be used. All ports are still cat5."

To quote a famous movie line, "What we've got here is... failure to communicate", both in the forum and in your house wiring. The Ooma systems send out to and receive from home telephones through the "Phone" port. You will not have phone service without some kind of connection from the Ooma's Phone port to a telephone. (You do not mention which Ooma box you own, Hub or Telo, but I don't think it matters in this situation.)

From your description, you're not making the final critical connection. You have to connect your Ooma's Phone port to your Cat5 telephone distributor in the AV closet and presumably from there to all of your home telephones. Your Gigabit switch sounds sweet, but it's a computer switch- it's not set up nor wired to power your telephones. The Ooma Phone port has a different style of connector than the Cat5 cable, but that's no problem. Just cut off one side of a Cat5 cable and crimp on a 4-wire telephone connector- be sure to use the same matched pair of wires on each end.
#69513 by nn5i
Sun Nov 21, 2010 7:44 pm
No one seems to have explained the most critical aspect with articulateness and clarity.

Your CAT6 wiring can carry EITHER Ethernet signals (from your gigabit switch to PCs, the Ooma internet connection, etc.) -- OR the analog telephone signals from the Ooma telephone connection to your various telephone instruments (phones, answering machines, wireless telephone base units, etc.).

But the same CAT6 wiring cannot carry BOTH of these simultaneously; you must have separate wiring for the Ethernet signals and the telephone signals. The Ooma device, of course, gets both -- but not in the same jack. Nothing else -- nothing -- gets both. What the Ooma device does is serve as a translator between these two very different signaling systems.

Ethernet signals require CAT5 or CAT6 wiring. But when you run the separate cabling for the telephone signals, that can be ordinary telephone wire, or it can be separate CAT5 or CAT6 cable; either kind will work.

But your Ethernet wiring cannot be connected to your telephone wiring, even if they happen to be physically the same kind of cable. They are carrying very different stuff, and can't be connected together at all. If you connect them together, something (probably your gigabit switch) will smoke the first time the phone rings, and never work again. They must be separate.
#69523 by davevt98
Mon Nov 22, 2010 7:02 am
Thanks for all the replies. It is getting clearer but I am still not there just yet. I looked further into the av distribution hub and saw that there is also a tm7556 telecom switch. I assume that this is the missing piece of the puzzle. I am still a little confused on how to hook it up.

Can someone please explain on what wires go where and whether I need rj45 or rj11 feeds? Thanks.
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#69525 by murphy
Mon Nov 22, 2010 8:43 am
That is used to distribute 4 incoming telephone lines to 8 different locations (4 phone lines is 8 wires and an RJ-45 jack has 8 wires. It uses RJ-45 jacks. It also has the ability to feed the line capture capability of an alarm system. It's a dumb design because it uses the same connectors as a LAN cable.

If you plug an active phone line into an LAN port it will instantly destroy the LAN port. Phone lines have 48 volts on them when on hook and 96 volts when a ringing signal is present. LAN ports are not designed to handle that much voltage.

You do not want identical jacks on your wall that serve two radically different purposes.

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